Volcanoes, palm trees, and privilege : essays on Hawai'i (Book, 2019) [University of Maryland, College Park]
skip to content
Volcanoes, palm trees, and privilege : essays on Hawai'i Preview this item
ClosePreview this item

Volcanoes, palm trees, and privilege : essays on Hawai'i

Author: Liz Prato
Publisher: Portland, OR : Overcup Press, 2019.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
"Volcanoes, Palm Trees And Privilege: Essays on Hawai'i by Liz Prato explores what it means to be a white tourist in a seemingly paradisiacal land that has been formed, and largely destroyed, by white outsiders. Hawaiian history, pop culture, and contemporary affairs are woven with personal narrative in fifteen essays that examine how the touristic ideal of Hawai'i came to be, and what it "is," at its core. The book  Read more...
Getting this item's online copy... Getting this item's online copy...

Find a copy in the library

Getting this item's location and availability... Getting this item's location and availability...

WorldCat

Find it in libraries globally
Worldwide libraries own this item

Details

Genre/Form: Essays
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Liz Prato
ISBN: 1732610304 9781732610309
OCLC Number: 1051134509
Description: 264 pages : maps ; 22 cm
Contents: To 'Okina, or not to 'Okina --
Flying under assumed names --
A Haole guide to Hawaiian taxonomy --
Bombs away --
Reverend Jim's ten commandments for growing up Haole on O'ahu --
Descendant(s) --
Island for sale! --
Pass the tabu: here's the story of the Brady Bunch in Hawai'i --
On the tail of 'Iniki --
Real Hawai'i --
Volcanoes, palm trees, and privilege: the self-contained paradise of the Hawaiian resort --
Hō'ihi: the meaning of respect --
Return to Kahala --
Return to Maui.
Responsibility: Liz Prato.

Abstract:

"Volcanoes, Palm Trees And Privilege: Essays on Hawai'i by Liz Prato explores what it means to be a white tourist in a seemingly paradisiacal land that has been formed, and largely destroyed, by white outsiders. Hawaiian history, pop culture, and contemporary affairs are woven with personal narrative in fifteen essays that examine how the touristic ideal of Hawai'i came to be, and what it "is," at its core. The book is a highly readable hybrid of the in-depth exploration of narrative journalism combined with the through-line of memoir"--Publisher's description.
Retrieving notes about this item Retrieving notes about this item

Reviews

User-contributed reviews

Tags

All user tags (5)

View most popular tags as: tag list | tag cloud

Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.