The protest psychosis : how schizophrenia became a black disease (Book, 2011) [University of Maryland, College Park]
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The protest psychosis : how schizophrenia became a black disease

The protest psychosis : how schizophrenia became a black disease

Author: Jonathan Metzl
Publisher: Boston, Mass : Beacon, 2011.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
In the United States psychiatrists consistently diagnose schizophrenia in African American men at rates four to five times higher than in other groups of persons. Metzl shows how, far from resulting from the racist intentions, misdiagnosis emerges from a much wider set of cultural shifts.
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Details

Genre/Form: Case studies
Études de cas
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Jonathan Metzl
ISBN: 0807001279 9780807001271
OCLC Number: 809699885
Notes: Originally published: 2009.
Description: xxi, 246 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Responsibility: Jonathan M. Metzl.

Abstract:

In the United States psychiatrists consistently diagnose schizophrenia in African American men at rates four to five times higher than in other groups of persons. Metzl shows how, far from resulting from the racist intentions, misdiagnosis emerges from a much wider set of cultural shifts.

A powerful account of how cultural anxieties about race shaped American notions of mental illness The civil rights era is largely remembered as a time of sit-ins, boycotts, and riots. But a very different civil rights history evolved at the Ionia State Hospital for the Criminally Insane in Ionia, Michigan. In The Protest Psychosis, psychiatrist and cultural critic Jonathan Metzl tells the shocking story of how schizophrenia became the diagnostic term overwhelmingly applied to African American protesters at Ionia-for political reasons as well as clinical ones. Expertly sifting through a vast array of cultural documents, Metzl shows how associations between schizophrenia and blackness emerged during the tumultuous decades of the 1960s and 1970s-and he provides a cautionary tale of how anxieties about race continue to impact doctor-patient interactions in our seemingly postracial America.

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