Dermatology in the cinema. (Article, 1995) [University of Maryland, College Park]
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Dermatology in the cinema.
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Dermatology in the cinema.

Author: V Reese Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Roger Williams Medical Center, Providence, Rhode Island, USA.
Edition/Format: Article Article : English
Publication:Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 1995 Dec; 33(6): 1030-5
  Peer-reviewed
Summary:
The depiction of skin disease in the cinema can be divided into three categories. These include skin findings on actors independent of the roles they portray, cutaneous disease used as a representation of evil, and skin disease represented realistically and sympathetically. Examples from a wide range of films are given, and implications for dermatologists and their patients are discussed.
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Details

Document Type: Article
All Authors / Contributors: V Reese Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Roger Williams Medical Center, Providence, Rhode Island, USA.
ISSN:0190-9622
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 121055227
Awards:

Abstract:

The depiction of skin disease in the cinema can be divided into three categories. These include skin findings on actors independent of the roles they portray, cutaneous disease used as a representation of evil, and skin disease represented realistically and sympathetically. Examples from a wide range of films are given, and implications for dermatologists and their patients are discussed.
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