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Darkness at noon

Author: Arthur Koestler
Publisher: New York : Scribner, ©1968.
Edition/Format:   Print book : Fiction : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Arthur Koestler's timeless classic, first published in 1941, is a powerful and haunting portrait of a Soviet revolutionary who is imprisoned and tortured under Stalin's rule. Set during Stalin's Moscow show trials of the 1930s, "Darkness at Noon "is an unforgettable portrait of an aging revolutionary, Nicholas, who is imprisoned and psychologically tortured by the very Party to which he has dedicated his life. As  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Legal fiction (Literature)
Historical fiction
Fiction
History
Novels
Material Type: Fiction
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Arthur Koestler
ISBN: 1416540261 9781416540267 9781476785554 1476785554
OCLC Number: 291143498
Description: ix, 273 pages ; 21 cm
Responsibility: Arthur Koestler ; translated by Daphne Hardy.

Abstract:

Arthur Koestler's timeless classic, first published in 1941, is a powerful and haunting portrait of a Soviet revolutionary who is imprisoned and tortured under Stalin's rule. Set during Stalin's Moscow show trials of the 1930s, "Darkness at Noon "is an unforgettable portrait of an aging revolutionary, Nicholas, who is imprisoned and psychologically tortured by the very Party to which he has dedicated his life. As the pressure increases to confess to committing preposterous crimes, he re-lives a career that embodies the terrible ironies and human betrayals of a totalitarian movement masking itself as an instrument of deliverance. Posing questions about ends and means, the story has relevance not only for the past, but for the perilous present.
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