The Abolitionist Sisterhood : Women's Political Culture in Antebellum America. (eBook, 2018) [University of Maryland, College Park]
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The Abolitionist Sisterhood : Women's Political Culture in Antebellum America.

The Abolitionist Sisterhood : Women's Political Culture in Antebellum America.

Author: Jean Fagan Yellin; John C Van Van Horne
Publisher: Ithaca : Cornell University Press, 2018.
Series: Cornell paperbacks.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
A small group of black and white American women who banded together in the 1830s and 1840s to remedy the evils of slavery and racism, the "antislavery females" included many who ultimately struggled for equal rights for women as well. Organizing fundraising fairs, writing pamphlets and giftbooks, circulating petitions, even speaking before "promiscuous" audiences including men and women-the antislavery women  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
History
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Yellin, Jean Fagan.
Abolitionist Sisterhood : Women's Political Culture in Antebellum America.
Ithaca : Cornell University Press, ©2018
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Jean Fagan Yellin; John C Van Van Horne
ISBN: 9781501711428 1501711423
Language Note: In English.
OCLC Number: 1038483456
Description: 1 online resource (384 pages)
Contents: Cover; Contents; Preface; List of Abbreviations; Chronology; Introduction; Part I: The Female Antislavery Societies; 1. On Their Own Terms: A Historiographical Essay; 2. Abolition's Conservative Sisters: The Ladies' New York City Anti-Slavery Societies, 1834-1840; 3. The Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society and the Limits of Gender Politics; 4. Priorities and Power: The Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society; Part II: Black Women in the Political Culture of Reform; 5. The World the Agitators Made: The Counterculture of Agitation in Urban Philadelphia. 6. ""You Have Talents-Only Cultivate Them"": Philadelphia's Black Female Literary Societies and the Abolitionist Crusade7. Benevolence and Antislavery Activity among African American Women in New York and Boston, 1820-1840; 8. Difference, Slavery, and Memory: Sojourner Truth in Feminist Abolitionism; Part III: Strategies and Tactics; 9. The Female Antislavery Movement: Fighting against Racial Prejudice and Promoting Women's Rights in Antebellum America; 10. ""Let Your Names Be Enrolled"": Method and Ideology in Women's Antislavery Petitioning. 11. Graphic Discord: Abolitionist and Antiabolitionist Images12. Abby Kelley and the Process of Liberation; 13. ""A Good Work among the People"": The Political Culture of the Boston Antislavery Fair; 14. By Moral Force Alone: The Antislavery Women and Nonresistance; Coda: Toward 1848; 15. ""Women Who Speak for an Entire Nation"": American and British Women at the World Anti-Slavery Convention, London, 1840; Bibliographical Notes; Notes on Contributors; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; W; Y; Z.
Series Title: Cornell paperbacks.

Abstract:

A small group of black and white American women who banded together in the 1830s and 1840s to remedy the evils of slavery and racism, the "antislavery females" included many who ultimately struggled for equal rights for women as well. Organizing fundraising fairs, writing pamphlets and giftbooks, circulating petitions, even speaking before "promiscuous" audiences including men and women-the antislavery women energetically created a diverse and dynamic political culture. A lively exploration of this nineteenth-century reform movement, The Abolitionist Sisterhood includes chapters on the principal female antislavery societies, discussions of black women's political culture in the antebellum North, articles on the strategies and tactics the antislavery women devised, a pictorial essay presenting rare graphics from both sides of abolitionist debates, and a final chapter comparing the experiences of the American and British women who attended the 1840 World Anti-Slavery Convention in London.
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"The overall aim of showing the impact, complexity and dynamic quality of female anti-slavery work is amply realized." * Slavery and Abolition * "This fine collection of essays explores the initial Read more...

 
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